Tag Archives: mash-up

Wave Chats

Today on #smchat one of the chatters, who always has great ideas (@hacool), chimed in that she had been on a Wave that included a chat gadget.  For those who are not as experienced with Wave, a gadget is just a mini app that runs inside the wave.  It is similar to the way you can watch a video which is embedded within a blog.

It got me thinking (as tools like Wave have a way of doing to people)….why couldn’t I embed a Tweetchat right into a Wave?  Brooks Bennett, the founder of tweetchat, was good enough to upgrade recently so that it is 100% embeddable. eg.  KMers.org

I tried it and it worked!!  Theoretically, what this will give you is the ability to get the best of both apps:

Twitter

  • Linear ie. just one spot to watch (the top of the chat), yet multi-threaded within that linear stream
  • Each tweet goes out to all that person’s followers acting as an announcement mechanism for the chat
  • Many different applications can be used to join the chat.

Wave

  • Better threading
  • Ability to group edit
  • Ability to go back and edit what was previously written

It seems to me that some combination of the two could be a dynamite package.  Who wants to do a trial run with me?

Unexpected Consequences

Before releasing a product it is always wise to do some customer research and to test said product with a sample set of customers.  However, one can never predict all the different ways that your product might be useful.  Unexpected consequences can be bad (children eating small toys), but some can be completely wonderful.

twebevent was recently launched as a way to combine video streams with a Twitter Chat.  We imagined that some people might blend audio from sites like TalkShoe and BlogTalkRadio to get a text chat going at the same time.  We did not anticipate that an enterprising user would embed an entire webcast technology.

@jfouts is a BrightTalk webcast user.  She realized that BrightTalk offers an embed and so she just plugged it into twebevent.  Voila, she had all the features of BrightTalk: slides, audio, polling, Q&A, etc… mashed wth all the features of twebevent: listed in the schedule, host branding at the top of the screen, Twitter Chat on her desired hashtag, etc…  You can view her recording here.

The moral of the story: the faster you get something out into the public domain, the faster you can learn everywhere it provides value.  There are lots of iterative improvements planned for twebevent, but we wanted to release it as quickly as possible even in an early state.  That strategy is paying off.

Association Meeting Simulcast

KMI LogoOn 8/26 at 6:30pm we went live with the first online simulcast for the Knowledge Management Institute.  We did it even with a few last minute challenges: one of our 3 speakers dropped out on the day of and our A/V expert also dropped out on the day of (both due to illness).

We soldiered on.  This post is both the story of what happened and the lessons we learned from the experience.  I hope it will serve as some sort of a guide for other associations.  If you have experience in this regard, please share as a comment.

Marketing: we promoted the free event on some KM mailing lists, our own mailing list, KM LinkedIn groups, and Twitter.

Preparation: we tested as much as we could (hardware, software, bandwidth) days before the event.  We arrived to the event 2 hours early to set-up equipment and run tests.  We could not get our video camera to stream (remember, no A/V expert) so we went with a back-up webcam.

Event: we went live within a few minutes of on-time.  We started and stopped the live event after each session because we wanted it to be broken into separate files.  We were running a Buzz format session which means 3 speakers for 10 minutes each and then 20 mins of discussion in-between.  We had ~15 person online audience for just about the whole event.  We hope for more ongoing, but felt that was good for our first event.

Here is a description of the software that we used (all free):

  • We kept the camera on the speaker and we used procaster.com (free download) to merge in the speaker’s slides from the streaming computer.  An on-site producer selects between speaker-only, slides-only, and smaller speaker together w/smaller slides at each point in time for what goes into the stream.
  • Procaster.com automatically streams to an account on livestream.com (free account if you are willing to allow some ads into your video stream).  You can pay money if you want the ads removed.
  • We took the embed code from livestream.com (it shows up right on the widget) and pasted it into the “Embed” field in twebevent.com.  This combined our live video with a Twitter Chat and placed it in the twebevent schedule for additional exposure.

To accomplish the above software configuration I recommend someone who is at least intermediate with using web applications.

Other important items:

  • you will need upload bandwidth of at least 500kbps (.5Mbps).  You can test that with speedtest.net from the location where you will be streaming.

Lessons Learned:

  1. It is best to outfit the speaker with a wireless mic that draws the sound into the streaming computer.  If the speaker is not mic’ed, you may get variable sound online as they walk around.
  2. Camera with tripod and zoom allows speakers more mobility
  3. If you are at a hotel with a conference code to get on their wireless, make sure that it allows you several connections.  This will allow some flexibility with testing (one streaming, one watching) as well as the ability for some on-site people to be tweeting to the event while another is running the livestream.
  4. If your event is structured like the Buzz where there are periods of time that the audience is discussing something at individual tables, point the camera at the crowd so that the online audience at least knows what is going on.  Also keep them posted on timing via Twitter
  5. If there is on-site Q&A, draw some of the questions from the online environment.  After the on-site session is over have the presenter answer more online questions on camera just for the online audience.
  6. If you have an extra projector, project the tweets that are coming in during the presentations.  If you have a very large audience, you may want to moderate that Twitter stream.  There are a few applications that will help with moderation.  Twubs.com is one.
  7. Upload the presentations somewhere that they can be accessed via URL (if you don’t have this, you can do it with Google Docs, remember to make the docs shared as “public”)  Link the uploaded docs into the twebevent so that people can download if they like.
  8. Open the presentations on the streaming laptop in “Normal View”.  Then use the procaster “Zoom” function to frame the slide.  This will allow you to do other things on the screen like: changing from one presentation to another, use the procaster producer, and use the slide picker on the left to jump to any slide without flipping around the slides

All in all it was a great experience.  You can view some of the videos that we captured at http://twebevent.com/KMIevent.  We will be running another simulcast on Oct 7.  Join the KMI mailing list or just follow the #KMers hashtag for more information as we get closer.

Please contact me if you are interested in learning more.  I am @swanwick on Twitter